Polestar 2 preview

Polestar 2 preview

Apr 7, 2020

Polestar 2 preview

What's this?
The true first model in a brave new dawn for Volvo’s erstwhile-performance-brand Polestar. Although the Polestar 1 has already been launched, it is a show-stopping halo car more than anything – a demonstration of what the fledgling company can do, no holds barred. But it is a carbon-bodied, highly expensive, plug-in hybrid grand tourer that will only be built in a production run of 1,500 units for the entire world. Polestar will, in fact, be a maker of pure electric vehicles (EVs) from hereon in, and the Polestar 2 is the pioneer of such desirable Swedish EVs.

What will its rivals be?
The Polestar 2 will take on the Tesla Model 3 among more. Pure electric premium vehicles are still reasonably thin on the ground, especially in hatchback form like this.

Any tech info?
It is believed the showroom-ready Polestar 2 will have the dual-motor set-up seen on some pre-production prototypes, which generates 305kW (414hp) and sends drive to all four wheels through a single-speed automatic transmission. The weight of the Polestar 2 is around 2.1 tonnes, but it should still be capable of 0-100km/h in around 4.7 seconds. With a 4.6-metre length and a 405-litre rear boot (there’s another 35 litres of stowage space up front), the Polestar 2 should be pretty practical for a plush family EV and the Swedish prestige arm of Volvo is also promising it will be exciting to drive. To that end, it gains the high-tech Öhlins dampers that Polestar has used in all of its products so far, a set of standard-fit 19-inch alloys and some powerful Brembo brakes.

What will the range be like?
Polestar has tested the 2 on the WLTP cycle, claiming between 473-563km of range on a single charge – the former figure is combined driving, involving extra-urban and motorway running, while the latter will only be achievable if you stick purely to city speeds. Even so, 563km is a huge range for a current EV, although the Polestar 2 only runs on a 400-volt architecture (unlike the Porsche Taycan and its 800-volt system) and so it’ll take between 35- and 45 minutes to refill 80 per cent of its battery’s charge on a 150kW DC connection.

Expectations?
They are incredibly high, mainly because of the stunning looks and performance of the flagship Polestar 1, and also because of the renaissance of Volvo as a prestige brand under the ownership of Geely. If Polestar can pull off the multiple aims of blending its parent company’s delightful cabin architecture and stylish exterior aesthetic with a Tesla Model 3-rivalling single-charge range and the sort of involving handling that’ll convert petrolheads to the EV revolution, then this could be one of the greatest electric cars yet seen – if Polestar can keep its pricing reasonable, that is.