Toyota Supra review

Driving the Toyota GR Supra on Irish roads.

Pros: Drama, focus, powertrain

Cons: Not special enough inside, high price

Fans of the Toyota Supra had an agonising 17 years to wait after the discontinuation of the much-loved fourth generation before the Japanese company finally launched a replacement in 2019. It’s called the GR Supra, as it was created by the firm’s ‘Gazoo Racing’ high-performance division, and it was developed in partnership with BMW.

Toyota Supra Ireland

Toyota Supra Design

While the new Supra’s exterior design hasn’t won universal approval, it certainly is attention grabbing. We love the rear view in particular, with its aggressive styling that is clearly lead by aerodynamics – check out the unusual sculpting of the back lights and the F1-inspired fog lamp mounted in the centre. A contoured roof gives the Supra distinctive coupe looks, while large alloy wheels add to its undeniable stance.

Toyota Supra Interior

Inside, the Supra has just two seats, and the boot can be accessed directly from the cabin, unusually. The design of the cabin might be Toyota’s, but anyone familiar with recent BMWs will spot the German company’s gear lever and some of the switchgear, not to mention the infotainment system’s menu layout. Still, it all works well.

Toyota Supra Interior

Toyota Supra Performance & Drive

BMW’s bits play a big part in the Supra driving experience, as well, as Toyota uses the same straight-six petrol engine and automatic gearbox as found in the BMW Z4 M40i. It’s a turbocharged 3.0-litre unit making 340hp and 500Nm of torque. Driving through the eight-speed transmission to the rear wheels, the Supra is a sports car by any measure. Toyota quotes a 0-100km/h time of just 4.3 seconds, which is fast, and that doesn’t convey how fantastic this six-cylinder engine sounds in the process. It’s cultured and muscular at the same time, smoothly revving from a subdued idle to a spine-tingling roar when extended. The gearbox is brilliant, as well, though we’d love to have the option of a manual.

To drive, the Supra is a bit of a mixed bag. Smooth roads are where it’s at its best, as the low-profile tyres and firm suspension fidget a little anywhere else, though it always feels controlled and the direct steering suits its personality. Despite appearances, it’s not at all bad on a long journey, either.

Toyota Supra Review

Toyota Supra Pricing

There are just two versions of the Supra sold in Ireland, the regular GR model, at €81,850, and the GR Premium version, which gets a useful amount of extra equipment for an extra €3,100.

Carzone Verdict 4.5/5

The new Toyota Supra is not a perfect sports car. It’s expensive, some won’t like how many BMW components it uses, some won’t love how it looks and we have reservations about the interior design. Neither is it the sharpest driving tool on the market. And yet, despite all that, we can’t help but love it for its mere existence. It’s a car to celebrate. 

Test Car Details:  

Model driven: Toyota GR Supra
Price as tested: €81,850

Engine: 3.0-litre turbocharged straight-six petrol

Transmission: automatic

Annual Motor Tax: €750

0-100km/h: 4.3 seconds

Power: 340hp

Boot space: 290 litres

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